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HOW WE HELP INDIVIDUALS

  • Grief Therapy & Counseling
  • Bereavement Groups
  • Early Parental Loss
  • Resources

WHEN TO REACH FOR SUPPORT

  • Depressed
  • Severely guilt ridden
  • Overly anxious about the future
  • Socially withdrawn
    & isolated
  • Having difficulty eating/sleeping
  • Chronic anger
    & bitterness
  • Unable to regain a sense of meaning

HOW WE Work with
Professionals

  • Workshops:
    • Schools
    • EAP Programs
    • Corporations
    • Funeral Homes
    • Palliative Care &
       Hospice
    • Caregiver    Organizations
  • Consultations
  • Crisis Intervention
    & Debriefing
  • Supervision
  • Workplace Grief Policy & Procedures

“LIVING LIFE ANEW”: ONGOING WEEKLY
THERAPY GROUP FOR SPOUSAL/PARTNER LOSS
FOR THOSE INDIVIDUALS
7 TO 9 MONTHS OR MORE POST-LOSS.

Focus on growth, identity issues, coping with change,
reassessing needs, as well as dealing with grief.


Tuesdays, 4:30 PM to 6 PM
Call or email for an appointment.

Fee Schedule and Insurance Issues
Can Be Found On Services Page.

UPCOMING PARENTAL LOSS GRIEF GROUP
FOR ADULTS WITH MORE RECENT PARENTAL

LOSS AND/OR EARLIER LOSS IN CHILDHOOD.

Thursdays, 4:30 PM to 6 PM (meets weekly for 10-12 weeks, or ongoing)
Call or email for an appointment.

Fee Schedule and Insurance Issues
Can Be Found On Services Page.

ONGOING COED WEEKLY GROUP THERAPY
FOR ADULTS, AGES 22-50.

Focus on relationships, including loss, intimacy, emotional
communication, and dealing with conflict constructively.

Wednesdays, 7:15 PM to 8:45 PM
Call or email for an appointment.

Fee Schedule and Insurance Issues
Can Be Found On Services Page.

Call now for pre-group individual consultation with Mary Sussillo, LCSW, Director, Center for Bereavement. Tel. 212-289-8570.

A New Understanding of Mourning

Each individual has a unique experience of grief that needs to be respected and supported rather than a series of steps or stages that must been endured.

While mourning is a very private experience, it does not occur in a social vacuum. The bereaved needs the witness and engagement of others.

Mourning is an active process, not a passive one. The bereaved need to find meaning in their loss and understand the impact of this significant death on their lives.

The mourner balances the complicated tasks of “letting go” and “holding on” to the lost significant other. There is a gradual acceptance that the loss is real, yet there is often the need to maintain a sense of connection.

Mourning often involves a lifelong process, rather than a time-limited period with a definite “closure” end point. While there is an acute period of mourning that is more circumscribed, the loss often continues to be revisited at crucial periods and integrated over a lifetime.

“Although many of us experience bereavement as a choiceless event, we have many choices in how we grieve.
. . . As we choose, new options open before us.” (Italics ours)

                                  —Thomas Attig

 

A New Understanding of Mourning is based on concepts from: Attig, T. (1996), Christ, G. (2000); Doka, K. (1998); Gaines, R. (1997); Hagman, G. (2001); Lobban, G. (2007); Neimeyer, R. (2001, 2002); Shapiro, E. (1994); Klass, D., Silverman, P. & Nickman, P. (1996); Stroebe, M. & Schut, H. (1999); Sussillo, M. (2005); Worden, J. (1996).

Click Links page for full references.